Exercise Improves Brain Function

It has long been believed by health professionals and the population at large, that as we age, we lose cognitive function in our brain. In other words, we become dim as we get old. We’re taught that it’s just something that happens and we have to learn to live with it.


Now we know that the myth that there’s nothing you can do about losing your marbles as you get older is just a myth. There is something you can do about the decreased mental ability that has long been associated with aging. It can be halted. It can also be reversed.


The current wisdom in health care is that as long as we remain active, really active as in aerobic-activity-active, we will stay sharp; we don’t have to just deal with decreased brain power as we get older.
Read this carefully: Our brain power will not deteriorate as we get older if we exercise.


Studies have shown that exercise, especially cardiovascular exercise, improves cognitive brain function. Described as improving function in the area of the brain known as “executive central command,” the largest improvements from exercising were seen in activities governed by this area.


Everyday activities like memory, planning, scheduling, and multitasking were shown to be much improved as a result of regular cardiovascular exercise. Subjects also reported an increased ability to deal with doubt and uncertainty as a result of exercising. These functions of brain activity typically decline as we age. Participants did not show such decline, as long as they continued regular aerobic-style cardiovascular workouts.


Studies on animals found that exercise affects brain function in a positive way by regenerating nerve cells, neurotransmitters, and blood vessels.
New nerve cells replace aging ones, halting the decline of cognitive functioning so prevalent as we age. The new nerve cells tend to stay sharp as long as we remain physically active.


New neurotransmitters assist our brain and nerve cells in communicating, resulting in the brain’s messages being clearly sent and clearly received. This is also the origin of the “runners high” experienced by some athletes while doing endurance exercises.


New blood vessels and the increased circulation associated with them, enables your body to more easily feed your brain the oxygen and nutrients it needs to continue to function in a healthy manner.


The original studies focused on aging adults and the effect of cardiovascular exercise on their brain function. Subsequent studies have found children and young adults enjoyed the same improved cognitive function and halting of brain deterioration as did older adults.


The conclusion: In addition to the well-documented benefits on physical health and fitness, cardiovascular-type exercises improve brain function in people of all ages.

It has long been believed by health professionals and the population at large, that as we age, we lose cognitive function in our brain. In other words, we become dim as we get old. We’re taught that it’s just something that happens and we have to learn to live with it.


Now we know that the myth that there’s nothing you can do about losing your marbles as you get older is just a myth. There is something you can do about the decreased mental ability that has long been associated with aging. It can be halted. It can also be reversed.


The current wisdom in health care is that as long as we remain active, really active as in aerobic-activity-active, we will stay sharp; we don’t have to just deal with decreased brain power as we get older.
Read this carefully: Our brain power will not deteriorate as we get older if we exercise.


Studies have shown that exercise, especially cardiovascular exercise, improves cognitive brain function. Described as improving function in the area of the brain known as “executive central command,” the largest improvements from exercising were seen in activities governed by this area.


Everyday activities like memory, planning, scheduling, and multitasking were shown to be much improved as a result of regular cardiovascular exercise. Subjects also reported an increased ability to deal with doubt and uncertainty as a result of exercising. These functions of brain activity typically decline as we age. Participants did not show such decline, as long as they continued regular aerobic-style cardiovascular workouts.


Studies on animals found that exercise affects brain function in a positive way by regenerating nerve cells, neurotransmitters, and blood vessels.
New nerve cells replace aging ones, halting the decline of cognitive functioning so prevalent as we age. The new nerve cells tend to stay sharp as long as we remain physically active.


New neurotransmitters assist our brain and nerve cells in communicating, resulting in the brain’s messages being clearly sent and clearly received. This is also the origin of the “runners high” experienced by some athletes while doing endurance exercises.


New blood vessels and the increased circulation associated with them, enables your body to more easily feed your brain the oxygen and nutrients it needs to continue to function in a healthy manner.


The original studies focused on aging adults and the effect of cardiovascular exercise on their brain function. Subsequent studies have found children and young adults enjoyed the same improved cognitive function and halting of brain deterioration as did older adults.


The conclusion: In addition to the well-documented benefits on physical health and fitness, cardiovascular-type exercises improve brain function in people of all ages.

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